Punctuality And Habits

On Punctuality Habits, whether good or bad, are generally acquired. When a person does a certain thing once and again, he is impelled by some unseen force to do the same thing repeatedly; thus a habit is formed. Once a habit is formed, it is difficult, and sometimes impossible, to shake it off. It is therefore very important that we should take great care in the formation of habits. Some bad habits formed in childhood may remain lifetime. Older persons also form bad habits, and in some cases they are ruined by these bad habits. There are good habits which, when formed in early life, are great blessings. Many successful people declare that they owe much of their success and prosperity to the formation of such good habits as punctuality, honesty, and perseverance in early life. Such habits as rudeness, laziness, stealing and slandering are bad habits. If we want to be useful to society, we ought to keep away from ail these vices, and strive to acquire those habits that are proven to be good for ourselves and others. Punctuality means observing regular or appointed time. A man who gets up at six o’clock every morning is punctual A man who has promised to call on a friend at five o’clock in the afternoon and actually does so at that hour is also punctual. On Habits Punctuality is a good habit, and unpunctuality is, of course, a bad one. A few minutes delay may not be a serious matter. But it may have bad results. Getting up five minutes later than usual may upset the plan of the...

How to Break a Bad Habit

Benjamin Franklin is often credited as saying that, “the best way to break a bad habit is to create a new one” Don’t deny it. You have some bad habits that are holding back your entrepreneurial success. Habits, good or bad, make you who you are. The key is controlling them. If you know how to change your habits, then even a small effort can create big changes. Here are some tips to get you started: 1. Decide how serious you are about breaking the habit. In addition to a strong commitment, you’ll need time and energy to pay attention to your behavior so that you can change it. 2. Keep track of when you do the behavior. Keep a dairy handy. 3. Compare your life with your value system. Do you live according to your value system? Or do you deviate from it here and there? Your value system acts like a compass that guides your life. When you do things that are not according to your life compass, you know that you have a problem. 4. Focus on only one small step each week to ensure long lasting results. For example, if you’re trying to lose weight, eliminate sweets from your diet for the first week. The next week eliminate other carbohydrates, like white bread, in addition to the...

The Power of Habits

If you’ve ever tried to sleep in on a Saturday morning only to wake-up at your normal hour, you know the power of habit. Your body refuses to get out of its normal routine. This is a profound lesson. Look at all the good you can do when you get in the habit of doing good things. Today, Jason Leister explains why his “Green Juice” routine has a lot to do with the habits that also build his business and help him create his world. Craig Ballantyne “Good habits, once established are just as hard to break as are bad habits.” – Robert Puller My Green Juice Habit by Jason Leister Just a minute before I sat down to write this, I downed (probably in record time) a tall glass of green juice. We’re talking spinach, parsley, cucumber and a hint of apple. I spent most of my life doing anything and everything in my power to avoid foods that were green. So it’s pretty funny to me that a single serving of this magic juice is probably the equivalent of several weeks’ worth my vegetable intake as a child. I’m on a mission to transform my physical health and start realizing my full potential in that area of my life. So I’m working out, eating well and actually taking the required time to preserve my health FIRST. Why now? Because it’s the only time slot I can get since my first choice (10 years ago) is no longer available. As I develop higher levels of excellence in other areas of my life like business, it’s becoming clear that...

The Magic of Repetition

People who can never seem to grab the brass ring are often guilty of nothing more than overlooking the basics. By basics, I’m talking about fundamental skills and activities such as time management, reading, organization, and developing an accurate perception of reality … the list goes on and on. But perhaps the most consistently overlooked basic of all is an innocuous little item called “repetition.” Repetition is how you become good at any sport, artistic endeavor, math, writing … just about any activity one can think of. We’ve all heard, many times over, the truism that “practice makes perfect.” Repetition is how I became a certified Microsoft Word expert. In the late nineties, I spent a year and a half writing a Microsoft Word reference guide, a project that required my learning, then repeating, every conceivable Word function hundreds of times. As a result of all that repetition, today I can perform most Word functions very quickly and without consciously thinking about it. My Word expertise is not because I’m a computer whiz, but because of the enormous amount of repetition I invested in the program. It’s the same with writing. I’d like to think I’ve improved a great deal as a writer over the past twenty-five years, and I attribute that improvement to having written millions of words during that period of time. In this regard, I often quote Mario Puzo, who summed it clearly nicely when he said, “Rewriting is the whole secret to writing.” An interesting paradox of repetition is that if you practice something slowly, you’ll actually learn it more quickly. I can think of...

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